Public Release: 

People with sedentary lifestyles are at increased risk of developing kidney disease

American Society of Nephrology

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Credit: Ferranti

Highlights

  • Each 80 minutes/day (assuming 16 awake hours/day) increase in sedentary duration was linked with a 20% increased likelihood of having chronic kidney disease in a recent study

  • Research that uncovered the association between sedentary behavior and kidney disease will be presented at ASN Kidney Week 2015 November 3-8 at the San Diego Convention Center in San Diego, CA.

San Diego, CA (October 20, 2015) -- Being sedentary for too long during the day may be a risk factor for chronic kidney disease, according to a study that will be presented at ASN Kidney Week 2015 November 3¬-8 at the San Diego Convention Center in San Diego, CA.

Sedentary behavior (engaging in activities in the seated or lying position that barely raise the energy expenditure above resting level) is commonly confused with physical inactivity (lack of moderate/vigorous physical activity). Sedentary behavior is an important risk factor for diabetes, hypertension, and obesity, but it's unclear whether it also increases the risk of chronic kidney disease.

Dominique Ferranti, Srini Beddhu, MD (University of Utah School of Medicine), and their colleagues examined this topic in 5873 adults in whom intensity and duration of physical activities were measured.

The researchers found that each 80 minutes/day (assuming 16 awake hours/day) increase in sedentary duration was associated with a 20% increased likelihood of chronic kidney disease. This association was independent of moderate/vigorous physical activity duration, demographics, coronary artery disease, congestive heart failure, lung disease and mobility limitations. Moreover, this association persisted even after adjusting for type 2 diabetes, hypertension, and obesity.

"Sedentary behavior, which is not mere lack of moderate/vigorous physical activity, is likely an independent risk factor for chronic kidney disease," said Dr. Beddhu. "It needs to be tested whether sedentary behavior affects the progression of chronic kidney disease, and thereby, increases the risk of end stage renal disease. Hence, interventions targeting sedentary behavior to slow the progression of chronic kidney disease need to be conducted."

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Studies: "Sedentary Behavior as a Risk Factor for CKD" (Abstract FR-OR112)

Disclosures: Srini Beddhu is a consultant for, receives research funding from, and is a scientific advisor for AbbVie. The authors acknowledge research funding from NIDDK.

ASN Kidney Week 2015, the largest nephrology meeting of its kind, will provide a forum for more than 13,000 professionals to discuss the latest findings in kidney health research and engage in educational sessions related to advances in the care of patients with kidney and related disorders. Kidney Week 2015 will take place November 3-8, 2015 in San Diego, CA.

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Founded in 1966, and with nearly 16,000 members, the American Society of Nephrology (ASN) leads the fight against kidney disease by educating health professionals, sharing new knowledge, advancing research, and advocating the highest quality care for patients.

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