Public Release: 

Kidney disease may increase hospitalized patients' risk of complications

American Society of Nephrology

Washington, DC (May 12, 2016) -- Patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) may be at an increased risk of experiencing complications when hospitalized, according to a study appearing in an upcoming issue of the Clinical Journal of the American Society of Nephrology (CJASN). This risk continues to rise as the severity of CKD increases.

Unintended injuries or complications can occur in hospitalized patients, and certain patient populations may be especially vulnerable to experiencing them. Because CKD is common and associated with a high risk of hospitalization, a team led by Scott Klarenbach MD, MSc and Babak Bohlouli, PhD candidate (University of Alberta) wondered how frequently hospital acquired complications occur in patients with CKD.

The investigators examined information on 536,549 adults hospitalized from April 1,

2003 to March 31, 2008 from a population based cohort called the Alberta Kidney Disease Network. Of these patients, 8.5% had CKD, and they tended to be older and more likely to be admitted for circulatory system diseases than those without CKD. After adjusting for various factors, patients with CKD were 19% more likely to experience hospital acquired complications than patients with normal kidney function. There was a graded relation between the risk of complications and CKD severity, with an 81% higher risk in those with the most severe CKD.

"Determining that patients with CKD are at greater risk of hospital complications will aid the development of targeted strategies to prevent such complications in this vulnerable patient population, and will improve quality of care," said Bohlouli.

###

Study co-authors include Marcello Tonelli, MD, SM, Terri Jackson, PhD, and Brenda Hemmelgarn MD, PhD.

Disclosures: The authors reported no financial disclosures.

The article, entitled "Risk of Hospital Acquired Complications in Patients with CKD," will appear online at http://cjasn.asnjournals.org/ on May 12, 2016, doi: 10.2215/CJN.09450915.

The content of this article does not reflect the views or opinions of The American Society of Nephrology (ASN). Responsibility for the information and views expressed therein lies entirely with the author(s). ASN does not offer medical advice. All content in ASN publications is for informational purposes only, and is not intended to cover all possible uses, directions, precautions, drug interactions, or adverse effects. This content should not be used during a medical emergency or for the diagnosis or treatment of any medical condition. Please consult your doctor or other qualified health care provider if you have any questions about a medical condition, or before taking any drug, changing your diet or commencing or discontinuing any course of treatment. Do not ignore or delay obtaining professional medical advice because of information accessed through ASN. Call 911 or your doctor for all medical emergencies.

Founded in 1966, and with nearly 16,000 members, the American Society of Nephrology (ASN) leads the fight against kidney disease by educating health professionals, sharing new knowledge, advancing research, and advocating the highest quality care for patients.

Disclaimer: AAAS and EurekAlert! are not responsible for the accuracy of news releases posted to EurekAlert! by contributing institutions or for the use of any information through the EurekAlert system.