Public Release: 

Lyncean Technologies Inc. receives export achievement award at Hannover Messe, Germany

Lyncean Technologies, Inc.

Lyncean Technologies, Inc. announced today that they recently received an Export Achievement Award from the United States Department Commerce's U.S. and Foreign Commercial Service (U.S. Commercial Service), for its recent success in exporting a Lyncean Compact Light Source to the Technical University of Munich.

The award, which acknowledges exceptional achievement in exporting a high-value product, was presented to Lyncean Technologies at the recent Hannover Messe trade show in Germany, where the United States was featured as the Partner Country. The award was presented at the company's booth on April 26, by Ken Hyatt, Deputy Under Secretary of Commerce for International Trade, who commented, "The success of U.S. exporters relies heavily on innovative companies, such as Lyncean Technologies, to bring new technologies to the marketplace and make them available globally."

Hannover Messe is the world's leading trade fair for industrial technology. Lyncean Technologies was invited to exhibit in the Research and Technology area of the show amongst other high-tech US companies and institutions to promote a new state of the art x-ray source. Lyncean Technologies CEO Michael Feser commented, "The Lyncean Compact Light Source is a new paradigm which enables advanced x-ray applications for scientific and industrial use. We deeply appreciate receiving this award from the U.S. Commercial Service, and we are very thankful for their support in helping us navigate through some of the challenges associated with exporting this type of complex system. This made our first shipment to the EU a great success."

Lyncean Technologies, Inc. is located in Fremont, California and was founded in 2001 to develop the Compact Light Source (CLS), a miniature synchrotron x-ray source based on research performed at the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory and Stanford University.

Unlike stadium-sized synchrotron radiation sources that require a highly technical support staff, the CLS fits in a typical laboratory space and is designed to be operated directly by academic or industrial end-users. By replacing the conventional "undulator" magnets found in the large synchrotrons by laser technology, the entire device scales down in size by a factor of 200. Unlike traditional laboratory sources, the CLS makes a narrow beam of nearly monochromatic X-rays which are adjustable in energy.

The first commercial Lyncean CLS was purchased in December 2012 by researchers from the newly formed Center for Advanced Laser Applications in Germany, a joint project of the Ludwig Maximilians University of Munich and the Technical University Munich (TUM). The Munich CLS was delivered at the end of 2014 and has been in routine operation since April 2015.

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For more information visit: http://www.lynceantech.com

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