Public Release: 

Scientists identify protein which could improve treatments for recurrent miscarriages

University of Sheffield

  • Syncytin-1 gene is result of a viral infection of our primate ancestors
  • Protein helps embryos implant in the womb
  • Discovery is crucial for many stressful pregnancy complications

Scientists at the University of Sheffield have identified a protein, involved in the development of the human placenta, may also help embryos implant in the womb - something which could improve treatments for recurrent miscarriages and pre-eclampsia.

The pioneering study shows that a protein called Syncytin-1, which was the result of a viral infection of our primate ancestors 25 million years ago, is first secreted on the surface of a developing embryo even before it implants in the womb.

This means the protein is likely to play a major role in helping embryos stick to the womb as well as the formation of the placenta.

This fundamental understanding of the earliest stages of human embryo development is crucial for improving current treatments for a variety of stressful complications during pregnancy such as recurrent miscarriages, foetal growth restriction syndrome and pre-eclampsia - a life-threatening condition of elevated maternal blood pressure during pregnancy.

Professor Harry Moore, Co-Director for the University's Centre for Stem Cell Biology and lead author of the study, said: "Recurrent miscarriages, foetal growth restriction syndrome and pre-eclampsia are all significant and very stressful complications of pregnancy.

"Eventually we may be able to develop blood tests based on our results to identify pregnancies that might be at risk and also develop appropriate therapies.

"There is a lot on the news about the Zika virus infection at the moment and its devastating effects on foetal development but not all viral infections are necessarily as disastrous. "

He added: "Amazingly the Syncytin-1 gene is the result of a viral infection of our primate ancestors 25 million years ago. The viral DNA got into our ancestors genome and was passed on through heredity and the gene involved in the fusion of the virus with cells for infection was co-opted and became Syncytin-1. Without it humans probably would not have evolved."

Surprisingly scientists know much more about the processes of early embryo development in animals than they do in humans. However, embryo development and reproduction is an aspect of biology where there are fundamental differences between species.

Researchers will now investigate whether the level of Syncytin-1 secretion on the pre-implantation embryo is somehow related to outcome of pregnancy in women undergoing IVF.

"Until now we didn't know this protein was expressed so early in the embryo.

"Interestingly the Syncytin-1 protein was mainly secreted in the cells of the embryo, called polar trophoblast cells, which will first stick to the cells of the womb called endometrial epithelial cells.

"In the lab we discovered the trophoblast cells that secrete Syncytin-1 not only fuse together - which in the body will form an essential barrier to protect the embryo - but also secrete nano-vesicles called exosomes.

"These exosomes may communicate with cells in other areas of the mother to prepare her for pregnancy. If this doesn't happen properly at the earliest stages it may cause problems throughout pregnancy."

The study is published today (Friday 13 May 2016) in the journal Human Reproduction [1].

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Additional information

[1] "Expression of Syncytin I (HERV-W), in the preimplantation human blastocyst, embryonic stem cells and trophoblast cells derived in vitro", by Bikem Soygur and Harry Moore. Human Reproduction, doi:10.1093/humrep/dew097.

The University of Sheffield

With almost 27,000 of the brightest students from over 140 countries, learning alongside over 1,200 of the best academics from across the globe, the University of Sheffield is one of the world's leading universities. A member of the UK's prestigious Russell Group of leading research-led institutions, Sheffield offers world-class teaching and research excellence across a wide range of disciplines. Unified by the power of discovery and understanding, staff and students at the university are committed to finding new ways to transform the world we live in. Sheffield is the only university to feature in The Sunday Times 100 Best Not-For-Profit Organisations to Work For 2016 and was voted number one university in the UK for Student Satisfaction by Times Higher Education in 2014. In the last decade it has won four Queen's Anniversary Prizes in recognition of the outstanding contribution to the United Kingdom's intellectual, economic, cultural and social life. Sheffield has five Nobel Prize winners among former staff and students and its alumni go on to hold positions of great responsibility and influence all over the world, making significant contributions in their chosen fields. Global research partners and clients include Boeing, Rolls-Royce, Unilever, AstraZeneca, Glaxo SmithKline, Siemens and Airbus, as well as many UK and overseas government agencies and charitable foundations.

For further information, please visit http://www.sheffield.ac.uk

For further information please contact: Amy Pullan, Media Relations Officer, University of Sheffield, 0114 222 9859, a.l.pullan@sheffield.ac.uk

To read other news releases about the University of Sheffield, visit http://www.sheffield.ac.uk/news

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