Public Release: 

New research could help develop drugs to better address heart problems in diabetics

The Physiological Society

Research published in Experimental Physiology shows that diabetes-induced changes in heartbeat are primarily regulated by the β1-adrenoceptor. This discovery, once confirmed in humans, may lead to better treatment of heart problems in diabetics by enabling more targeted drugs to be produced.

Patients with type 2 diabetes can have problems with the regulation of their heartbeat. The heartbeat is partly regulated by receptors called beta-adrenoceptors. There are two different forms, the β1 and β2, and each has a different function. The study found that the diabetes-induced changes in heartbeat are predominantly regulated by the β1-adrenoceptor, and not the β2-adrenoceptor.

Beta-blockers block hormones like adrenaline and can used to decrease heart rate and blood pressure in the treatment of conditions such as angina or high blood pressure. Some beta-blockers are not effective in reducing the heartbeat of diabetics and can even worsen the blood glucose levels of patients. It is not known which beta-adrenoceptor type is responsible for these effects. This study suggests that beta-blockers targeting the β1-adrenoceptor would be more effective for diabetics.

The researchers implanted two devices into a rat model of diabetes. The first device measured blood pressure and heartbeat, and the second device injected drugs that reduce heartbeat by targeting the beta-adrenoceptors. This approach allowed the researchers to distinguish between the contributions of the two different beta-adrenoceptors (β1 and ?2).

Regis Lamberts, corresponding author said, 'This study provides novel insight into the pathological basis of heart rate dysregulation in type 2 diabetes. This could help us develop drugs to better address heart problems in diabetics.'

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Notes for Editors

1. Full paper title: Link to paper http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/ 10.1113/EP086293/full (Link will only work after the embargo date. Before then, please email the press office for a copy of the paper)

2. Experimental Physiology publishes translation and integration of research, specifically manuscripts that deal with both physiological and pathophysiological questions that investigate gene/protein function using molecular, cellular and whole animal approaches. http://ep.physoc.org

3. The Physiological Society brings together over 3,500 scientists from over 60 countries. The Society promotes physiology with the public and parliament alike. It supports physiologists by organising world-class conferences and offering grants for research and also publishes the latest developments in the field in its three leading scientific journals, The Journal of Physiology, Experimental Physiology and Physiological Reports. http://www.physoc.org

Contacts:

The Physiological Society:
Julia Turan, Communications Manager
pressoffice@physoc.org
+44 (0)20 7269 5727

Corresponding author:
Regis Lamberts, PhD
Senior Lecturer
Department of Physiology - HeartOtago
University of Otago
regis.lamberts@otago.ac.nz

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