Public Release: 

Smart toys without the batteries

American Chemical Society

IMAGE

IMAGE: When 'smart' puzzle pieces are pushed down into the correct spot, a letter 'C' for correct appears. view more 

Credit: American Chemical Society

The greatest challenge in entertaining young children is keeping their toys powered up. Now, one group reports in the journal ACS Sustainable Chemistry & Engineering that they are one step closer to battery-free interactive games.

According to the American Academy of Pediatrics, 97 percent of children in the U.S. under the age of 4 have had some type of exposure to a mobile device. These devices are limited by the batteries' ability to hold a charge. But in order to eliminate the need for batteries, researchers must have a way to produce and store energy. Scientists are investigating options such as solar cells, like those in many calculators; supercapacitors, found in hybrid car batteries; and small specialized generators. While all these routes face challenges, current designs of triboelectric nanogenerators (TENGs) are complex, heavy, rigid and bulky. Sang-Jae Kim and colleagues wanted to make a lightweight, flexible and simple TENG that could be used in a smart interactive puzzle.

The team designed a smart puzzle TENG from recycled plastics, which made it lightweight, flexible and portable. As the puzzle pieces were placed and pushed down into the proper spots, electricity was generated and an LED display indicated the letter "C" for "correct". The TENG puzzle was stable over long periods of operation time with little damage to the electrical signal. The researchers say that their smart puzzle shows that TENGs could be used in self-powered smart toys.

###

The author acknowledges funding from the National Research Foundation of Korea and the South Korea Government.

The abstract that accompanies this study is available here.

The American Chemical Society, the world's largest scientific society, is a not-for-profit organization chartered by the U.S. Congress. ACS is a global leader in providing access to chemistry-related information and research through its multiple databases, peer-reviewed journals and scientific conferences. ACS does not conduct research, but publishes and publicizes peer-reviewed scientific studies. Its main offices are in Washington, D.C., and Columbus, Ohio.

To automatically receive news releases from the American Chemical Society, contact newsroom@acs.org.

Follow us on Twitter | Facebook

Disclaimer: AAAS and EurekAlert! are not responsible for the accuracy of news releases posted to EurekAlert! by contributing institutions or for the use of any information through the EurekAlert system.