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Albert Einstein teams find 89 percent of hispanic women use herbal remedies

Mary Ann Liebert, Inc./Genetic Engineering News

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Credit: Mary Ann Liebert, Inc., publishers

New Rochelle, NY, October 30, 2017-A new study comparing use of herbal remedies among Hispanic women and non-Hispanic white women showed higher than expected use of herbal treatments by both groups, 89% and 81%, respectively. Notably, less than 1 in 6 Hispanic women and only a third of white women discussed the use of herbal treatments with their doctors, as reported in an article published in The Journal of Alternative and Complementary Medicine (JACM), a peer-reviewed publication from Mary Ann Liebert, Inc., publishers. The article is available free on JACM website.

In "Prevalence of Complementary and Alternative Medicine and Herbal Remedy Use in Hispanic and Non-Hispanic White Women: Results from the Study of Women's Health Across the Nation," authors Robin Green, PsyD, et al., from Albert Einstein College of Medicine (Bronx, NY), University of Colorado School of Medicine and School of Public Health (Aurora), and University of Washington (Seattle), examined the use of integrative medicine approaches such as botanical and herbal remedies. The highest reported use of herbals was as teas. The researchers emphasized the need for physicians to ask patients about herbal treatments to identify potential interactions with or patient use as replacements for conventional medications.

"The survey is yet another sign of how deeply once 'alternative' choices are permeating daily behavior," says JACM Editor-in-Chief John Weeks, johnweeks-integrator.com, Seattle, WA., "and especially in a Hispanic population after early use data led many to portray complementary and alternative medical use as predominantly a phenomenon among a white and privileged class."

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Research reported in this publication was supported by the National Institutes of Health under Award Numbers U01NR004061, U01AG012505, U01AG012535, U01AG012531, U01AG012539, U01AG012546, U01AG012553, U01AG012554, and U01AG012495. The content is solely the responsibility of the authors and does not necessarily represent the official views of the National Institutes of Health.

About the Journal

The Journal of Alternative and Complementary Medicine (JACM) is a monthly peer-reviewed journal published online with open access options and in print. Led by John Weeks (johnweeks-integrator.com), the Co-founder and past Executive Director of the Academic Collaborative for Integrative Health, the Journal provides observational, clinical, and scientific reports and commentary intended to help healthcare professionals, delivery organization leaders, and scientists evaluate and integrate therapies into patient care protocols and research strategies. Complete tables of content and a sample issue may be viewed on JACM website.

About the Publisher

is a privately held, fully integrated media company known for establishing authoritative peer-reviewed journals in many promising areas of science and biomedical research, including Alternative and Complementary Therapies, Medical Acupuncture, and Journal of Medicinal Food. Its biotechnology trade magazine, GEN (Genetic Engineering & Biotechnology News), was the first in its field and is today the industry's most widely read publication worldwide. A complete list of the firm's 80 journals, books, and newsmagazines is available on the Mary Ann Liebert, Inc., publishers website.

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