Public Release: 

Lupus treatment generates positive results in Phase III clinical trial

Wiley

New research indicates that belimumab, a monoclonal antibody therapy that targets a component of the immune system, provides considerable benefits to patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), a predominately female, chronic inflammatory disease that can affect virtually any organ. The Arthritis & Rheumatology findings are encouraging because lupus is among the leading causes of death in young women.

SLE is a chronic, multisystem autoimmune disorder with a broad range of symptoms, and its development involves defective activation of B cells--the immune cells charged with producing antibodies that attack invading bacteria, viruses, and toxins. B lymphocyte stimulator is a molecule involved in B cell differentiation, and elevated levels may contribute to the production of autoantibodies that target healthy cells and tissues.

To investigate the efficacy and safety of belimumab, which targets B lymphocyte stimulator, Andrea Doria, MD, of the University of Padova, in Italy, and her colleagues conducted a phase III, double-blind, placebo-controlled study that randomized SLE patients 2:1 to weekly subcutaneous injections of belimumab 200 mg or placebo, plus standard lupus therapy, for 52 weeks. Belimumab is currently given by intreavenous infusion, but the subcutaneous formulation of has recently become available.

In analyses of 356 patients with certain clinical characteristics indicative of high disease activity (hypocomplementemic and anti-dsDNA-positive), more patients in the belimumab group experienced reduced lupus disease activity, as measured by what is called the SLE responder index (64.6% versus 47.2%), and there was a lower incidence of severe SLE flares (14.1% versus 31.5%). Also, more people in the belimumab group were able to reduce their need for steroids. Side effects were similar between the groups.

"Intravenous administration of belimumab is an obstacle to treatment for many patients due to the need to go to the hospital for drug infusions. Thus, a higher number of patients could benefit from this treatment," said Dr. Doria. "The self-administration of subcutaneous belimumab makes hospital access unnecessary, which leads to economic savings for patients and the community."

An accompanying report in Arthritis & Rheumatology ranks lupus deaths among the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's leading causes-of-death to determine the relative burden of SLE deaths in women. (The agency compiles an annual leading-causes-of-death ranking based on a selected list of 113 causes, but SLE is not included on this list.) The report notes that during 2000-2015, there were 28,411 female deaths in the United States that had SLE recorded as the underlying or contributing cause of death. SLE ranked as the 10th leading cause of death in the 15-24-year age group, 14th in 25-34-year and 35-44-year age groups, and 15th in 10-14-year age group. Among black and Hispanic females, SLE ranked 5th in the 15-24-year, 6th in the 25-34-year, and 8th-9th in the 35-44-year age groups, after excluding three common external injury causes of death (unintentional injury, homicide, and suicide) from the analysis.

###

Full Citations

"Efficacy and Safety of Subcutaneous Belimumab in Anti-dsDNA-Positive, Hypocomplementemic Patients with Systemic Lupus Erythematosus." Andrea Doria, William Shohl, Andreas Schwarting, Masato Okada, Morton Scheinberg, Ronald van Vollenhoven, Anne Hammers, James Groark, Damon Bass, Norma Lynn Fox, David Roth, and David Gordon. Arthritis & Rheumatology; Published Online: April 19, 2018 (DOI: 10.1002/art.40511)

URL Upon Publication: http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/art.40511

"Lupus - An Unrecognized Leading Cause of Death in Young Women: Population-based Study Using Nationwide Death Certificates, 2000-2015." Eric Y. Yen, Ram R. Singh. Arthritis & Rheumatology; Published Online: April 19, 2018 (DOI: 10.1002/art.40512).

URL Upon Publication: http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/art.40512

Author Contact: Carla Menaldo, of the University of Padova's press office, at carla.menaldo@unipd.it or +390498273520.

About the Journal

Arthritis & Rheumatology is an official journal of the American College of Rheumatology (ACR) and covers all aspects of inflammatory disease. The American College of Rheumatology (http://www.rheumatology.org) is the professional organization whose members share a dedication to healing, preventing disability, and curing the more than 100 types of arthritis and related disabling and sometimes fatal disorders of the joints, muscles, and bones. Members include practicing physicians, research scientists, nurses, physical and occupational therapists, psychologists, and social workers. The journal is published by Wiley on behalf of the ACR. For more information, please visit http://wileyonlinelibrary.com/journal/art.

About Wiley

Wiley, a global research and learning company, helps people and organizations develop the skills and knowledge they need to succeed. Our online scientific, technical, medical, and scholarly journals, combined with our digital learning, assessment and certification solutions help universities, learned societies, businesses, governments and individuals increase the academic and professional impact of their work. For more than 210 years, we have delivered consistent performance to our stakeholders. The company's website can be accessed at http://www.wiley.com.

Disclaimer: AAAS and EurekAlert! are not responsible for the accuracy of news releases posted to EurekAlert! by contributing institutions or for the use of any information through the EurekAlert system.