Public Release: 

Study reveals racial and ethnic disparities in pediatric kidney transplantation outcomes

American Society of Nephrology

Highlights

  • From 1995 to 2014, patient survival after kidney transplantation improved overall for pediatric recipients in the United States; however, racial/ethnic disparities in long-term survival worsened over time.
  • Results from the study will be presented at ASN Kidney Week 2018 October 23-October 28 at the San Diego Convention Center.

San Diego, CA (October 25, 2018) -- Although there have been considerable reductions in disparities in adult kidney transplant outcomes in the United States, a new study found that disparities in long-term patient survival among pediatric kidney transplant recipients have worsened. The findings will be presented at ASN Kidney Week 2018 October 23-October 28 at the San Diego Convention Center.

For the study, Tanjala Purnell, MPH, PhD (Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine) and her colleagues examined information on 3,295 White, 2,049 Black, and 2,073 Hispanic children who received a kidney transplant in the United States between January 1, 1995 and December 31, 2014.

From 1995 to 2014, patient survival after transplantation improved for all recipients; however, racial/ethnic disparities in long-term survival worsened over time. In 1995, compared with White kidney transplant recipients, Black and Hispanic recipients had 11% and 49% reduced risks of death, respectively. In 2014, compared with White recipients, Black recipients had an 84% higher risk and Hispanics had a 29% lower risk.

"In this national study of pediatric kidney transplant recipients, we found that while survival after KT improved overall, disparities in long-term patient survival worsened from 1995 to 2014. ?In stark contrast to prior study findings of reduced racial/ethnic disparities in outcomes for adult kidney transplant recipients, we found that disparities in long-term survival worsened over the last two decades for Black children in the United States," said Dr. Purnell. "Our findings suggest that national strategies to elucidate and intervene on mechanisms driving disparities among pediatric kidney transplant recipients are needed."

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Study: "Racial and Ethnic Disparities in Pediatric Kidney Transplant Outcomes in the United States: Have We Made Any Progress Over the Last Twenty Years?"

ASN Kidney Week 2018, the largest nephrology meeting of its kind, will provide a forum for more than 13,000 professionals to discuss the latest findings in kidney health research and engage in educational sessions related to advances in the care of patients with kidney and related disorders. Kidney Week 2018 will take place October 23 - October 28 at the San Diego Convention Center.  

Since 1966, ASN has been leading the fight to prevent, treat, and cure kidney diseases throughout the world by educating health professionals and scientists, advancing research and innovation, communicating new knowledge, and advocating for the highest quality care for patients. ASN has more than 20,000 members representing 131 countries. For more information, please visit http://www.asn-online.org.

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