Public Release: 

Virus- and oncogene-free reprogramming method for the production of iPSCs published in the journal Regenerative Medicine

Regenerative Medicine is delighted to publish open access original research demonstrating the first virus- and oncogene-free induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC) technology to produce safer pluripotent stem cells from cord blood and peripheral blood.

Future Science Group

Cellular Engineering Technologies, the John Paul II Medical Research Institute and the University of Iowa (all IA, USA) have announced a new milestone in the field of regenerative medicine involving the creation of safer and non-controversial pluripotent stem cells from cord blood and peripheral blood obtained from donors. The group, led by Alan Moy (from the above institutions), published their research findings in the scientific journal Regenerative Medicine in an ahead-of-print, open access article entitled "Virus-free and oncogene-free induced pluripotent stem cell reprogramming in cord blood and peripheral blood in patients with lung disease." The study presents, for the first time, a novel approach for the creation of iPSCs without the need to use viruses and, more importantly, the standard oncogenes (cancer genes) used to produce iPSCs.

The study creates new opportunities to extend the diversity and lifelong utility of cord blood. Parents currently bank their child's cord blood for presumed future private use. However, private cord blood storage has several shortcomings, which include rare and limited therapeutic indications during childhood, as well as an insufficient number and diversity of stem cells to treat chronic disease in adulthood.

The study also reports the creation of iPSCs from peripheral blood in patients with cystic fibrosis and alpha one antitrypsin deficiency, a genetic cause of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. The production of safer pluripotent stem cells from peripheral blood offer more predictive patient models of disease for drug development without untoward influences from viral and oncogenic effects. In addition, the approach provides a safer autologous (patient's own) pluripotent stem cell therapy for future use. The technology aims to advance personalized and regenerative medicine, drug discovery and bio-banking. Virus- and oncogene-free iPSCs are expected to offer broader utility than the direct use of cord blood for a diverse spectrum of diseases, including neurodegenerative, cardiopulmonary, retinal, arthritic, metabolic and autoimmune disorders and cancer.

"We appreciate Regenerative Medicine for publishing this important study", stated Alan Moy. "This virus and oncogene-free iPSC reprogramming for CD34+ cells and adherent cells represents a milestone that addresses the safety challenges inherent with pluripotent stem cell therapies."

###

The presented open access article, "Virus-free and oncogene-free induced pluripotent stem cell reprogramming in cord blood and peripheral blood in patients with lung disease," can be accessed online at: https://www.futuremedicine.com/doi/10.2217/rme-2018-0041

For more information, contact: info@celleng-tech.com or phone: (319) 688-7367 (John Paul II Medical Research Institute).

About Regenerative

Regenerative Medicine (Medline, IF (2017):2.992) is part of the internationally recognized Future Medicine portfolio and is supported by a multidisciplinary, international editorial board comprising leading researchers and opinion leaders from academia and industry, including Senior Editor Chris Mason (UCL, UK), and Associate Editors Robert Lanza (Astellas GRM, CA, USA), Phillipe Menasché (Hôpital Européen Georges Pompidou, FR), Gail Naughton (Histogen Inc., CA, USA) and Glyn Stacey (International Stem Cell Banking Initiative, UK).

Regenerative Medicine focuses on the entire spectrum of approaches in regenerative medicine, including small molecule drugs, biologics, biomaterials, tissue engineering, and cell and gene therapies. The peer-reviewed journal uniquely supports this important area of biomedical science and healthcare by publishing the very best research and opinion, encompassing all aspects of the sector ranging from discovery research, to clinical development and commercialization.

For additional information on the journal's aims and scope, editorial board and the latest content, please visit the the Future Medicine website: https://www.futuremedicine.com/journal/rme

The journal is also partnered with RegMedNet, a free eCommunity aiming to promote global collaboration between all members of the regenerative medicine field as well as keep users up to date with the latest news and opinion, by providing exclusive features, webinars and more.

About Future Science Group (FSG)

Founded in 2001, London-based FSG is a progressive publisher focused on breakthrough medical, biotechnological and scientific research. FSG's portfolio includes two imprints, Future Science and Future Medicine. In addition to the core journal publishing business, FSG develops specialist eCommunities. Key titles and sites include Bioanalysis Zone, RegMedNet, Nanomedicine and the award-winning Regenerative Medicine.

The aim of FSG is to service the advancement of clinical practice and drug research by enhancing the efficiency of communications among clinicians, researchers and decision-makers, and by providing innovative solutions to their information needs. This is achieved through a customer-centric approach, use of new technologies, products that deliver value-for-money and uncompromisingly high standards. Please see http://www.futuremedicine.com for more information.

Disclaimer: AAAS and EurekAlert! are not responsible for the accuracy of news releases posted to EurekAlert! by contributing institutions or for the use of any information through the EurekAlert system.