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Stroke produces dysfunctional brain cells

Intervening in production of dysfunctional cells could mitigate memory impairments

Society for Neuroscience

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IMAGE: Figure 6. Uncoupled intrinsic and synaptic excitability in DCX+ ABGCs after stroke. view more 

Credit: Ceanga et al., JNeurosci (2019)

Mice produce new neurons in the hippocampus following a stroke that fail to develop properly, finds new research published in JNeurosci. Intervening in the production of these cells may help to mitigate stroke-induced memory impairments.

Stroke has long been known to increase adult neurogenesis. Despite the proliferation of new cells in a brain region critical for memory, previous stroke research in animals shows this process is accompanied by deficits on tasks that depend on the hippocampus. These observations led Albrecht Kunze and colleagues to investigate how newborn cells mature and integrate into the existing hippocampal network after stroke.

By temporarily cutting off blood supply to the brains of male and female mice, the researchers demonstrate the neurons generated as a result of this stroke model develop into hyperexcitable cells that may contribute to hippocampal dysfunction. This finding begins to uncover the cellular mechanisms underlying post-stroke neuropsychiatric disorders.

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Article: Stroke accelerates and uncouples intrinsic and synaptic excitability maturation of mouse hippocampal DCX+ adult-born granule cells
DOI: http://www.jneurosci.org/lookup/doi/10.1523/JNEUROSCI.3303-17.2018
Corresponding author: Albrecht Kunze (Jena University Hospital, Germany), albrecht.kunze@med.uni-jena.de

About JNeurosci

JNeurosci, the Society for Neuroscience's first journal, was launched in 1981 as a means to communicate the findings of the highest quality neuroscience research to the growing field. Today, the journal remains committed to publishing cutting-edge neuroscience that will have an immediate and lasting scientific impact, while responding to authors' changing publishing needs, representing breadth of the field and diversity in authorship.

About The Society for Neuroscience

The Society for Neuroscience is the world's largest organization of scientists and physicians devoted to understanding the brain and nervous system. The nonprofit organization, founded in 1969, now has nearly 37,000 members in more than 90 countries and over 130 chapters worldwide.

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