News Release 

Skipping breakfast associated with increased risk of cardiovascular death

Eating breakfast regularly lowered cardiovascular-specific and stroke-specific mortality

American College of Cardiology

New evidence underscores the importance of eating breakfast every day, according to a study published today in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology that showed skipping breakfast was significantly associated with an increased risk of death from heart disease.

Using data from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey from 1988 to 1994 with an average follow-up of 18 years, researchers collected information from 6,550 participants, 40 to 75 years of age, who had no history of cardiovascular disease or cancer. Participants were asked "How often do you eat breakfast?" and possible answers included, "every day," "some days," "rarely" and "never." Among the participants, 5.1 percent never ate breakfast, 10.9 percent rarely ate breakfast, 25 percent ate breakfast some days and 59 percent ate breakfast every day.

Participants who never consumed breakfast had an 87 percent higher risk of cardiovascular disease-specific mortality than those who consumed breakfast every day. Researchers said skipping breakfast was associated with changes in appetite and decreased satiety, elevated blood pressure, and harmful changes in lipid levels. It was also a behavioral marker for unhealthy lifestyle habits.

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The American College of Cardiology envisions a world where innovation and knowledge optimize cardiovascular care and outcomes. As the professional home for the entire cardiovascular care team, the mission of the College and its more than 52,000 members is to transform cardiovascular care and to improve heart health. The ACC bestows credentials upon cardiovascular professionals who meet stringent qualifications and leads in the formation of health policy, standards and guidelines. The College also provides professional medical education, disseminates cardiovascular research through its world-renowned JACC Journals, operates national registries to measure and improve care, and offers cardiovascular accreditation to hospitals and institutions. For more, visit acc.org.

The Journal of the American College of Cardiology ranks among the top cardiovascular journals in the world for its scientific impact. JACC is the flagship for a family of journals--JACC: Cardiovascular Interventions, JACC: Cardiovascular Imaging, JACC: Heart Failure, JACC: Clinical Electrophysiology and JACC: Basic to Translational Science--that prides themselves in publishing the top peer-reviewed research on all aspects of cardiovascular disease. Learn more at JACC.org.

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