News Release 

Can exercise, swimming goggles help protect astronauts against spaceflight-associated changes to eye, vision?

JAMA Ophthalmology

Bottom Line: Astronauts on long missions at the International Space Station can experience changes to their eyes and vision that can last for years. This study included 20 men who on three separate days at NASA's Johnson Space Center in Houston completed exercises while on their back and tilted back head-first (to simulate the effect of exercise in space); 10 of the participants wore swimming goggles. Researchers found exercise was associated with decreases in pressure in the eye, while the addition of swimming goggles was associated with modestly increased pressure, which could reduce some of the adverse effects on the eye of long-duration spaceflights. These findings need to be replicated in spaceflight to determine whether increasing eye pressure with swim googles is safe and effective.

Authors: Jessica M. Scott, Ph.D., Universities Space Research Association, Houston, and Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, and coauthors

(doi:10.1001/jamaophthalmol.2019.0459)

Editor's Note: The article includes conflict of interest and funding/support disclosures. Please see the article for additional information, including other authors, author contributions and affiliations, financial disclosures, funding and support, etc.

###

Embed this link to provide your readers free access to the full-text article: This link will be live at the embargo time https://jamanetwork.com/journals/jamaophthalmology/fullarticle/2731480?guestAccessKey=c767a740-0d3b-4138-af29-cb12c842ee25&utm_source=For_The_Media&utm_medium=referral&utm_campaign=ftm_links&utm_content=tfl&utm_term=041819

Disclaimer: AAAS and EurekAlert! are not responsible for the accuracy of news releases posted to EurekAlert! by contributing institutions or for the use of any information through the EurekAlert system.