News Release 

Blood pressure drug shows no benefit in Parkinson's disease

American Academy of Neurology

PHILADELPHIA - A study of a blood pressure drug does not show any benefit for people with Parkinson's disease, according to findings released today that will be presented at the American Academy of Neurology's 71st Annual Meeting in Philadelphia, May 4 to 10, 2019.

The drug isradipine had shown promise in small, early studies and hopes were high that this could be the first drug to slow the progression of the disease.

"Unfortunately, the people who were taking isradipine did not have any difference in their Parkinson's symptoms over the three years of the study compared to the people who took a placebo," said study author Tanya Simuni, MD, of Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine in Chicago and a member of the American Academy of Neurology.

The phase 3 study involved 336 people with early Parkinson's disease at 54 sites in the US and Canada as part of the Parkinson Study Group. Half of the participants received 10 milligrams daily of isradipine for three years, while the other half received a placebo.

The drug had shown promise in animal studies, and a phase 2 study in humans did not show any safety concerns. Researchers became interested in the drug when the observation was made that use of the drug for high blood pressure was associated with a lower risk of developing Parkinson's disease.

"Of course, this is disappointing news for everyone with Parkinson's disease and their families, as well as the research community," Simuni said. "However, negative results are important because they provide a clear answer, especially for the drug that is commercially available. We will all continue to work to find a treatment that can slow down or even cure this disease."

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The study was supported by the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke. Some biosample collection and the preceding phase 2 study were funded by The Michael J. Fox Foundation for Parkinson's Research.

Learn more about Parkinson's disease at BrainandLife.org, home of the American Academy of Neurology's free patient and caregiver magazine focused on the intersection of neurologic disease and brain health. Follow Brain & Life® on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram.

The American Academy of Neurology is the world's largest association of neurologists and neuroscience professionals, with more than 36,000 members. The AAN is dedicated to promoting the highest quality patient-centered neurologic care. A neurologist is a doctor with specialized training in diagnosing, treating and managing disorders of the brain and nervous system such as Alzheimer's disease, stroke, migraine, multiple sclerosis, concussion, Parkinson's disease and epilepsy.

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Media Contacts:

Renee Tessman, rtessman@aan.com, (612) 928-6137

Angharad Chester Jones, achester-jones@aan.com, (612) 928-6120

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