News Release 

Research reveals how diet influences diabetes risk

New findings could lead to better prevention and management of type 2 diabetes

American Society for Nutrition

Baltimore (June 8, 2019) - Could changing what we eat lower the chances of developing type 2 diabetes? Studies presented at Nutrition 2019 will examine how consuming certain foods, vitamins and even the order in which we eat can affect blood sugar levels and risk of developing 2 diabetes.

Nutrition 2019 is being held June 8-11, 2019 at the Baltimore Convention Center. Contact the media team for more information or to obtain a free press pass to attend the meeting.

What and how we eat influences diabetes risk

Fewer new diabetes cases seen in people who eat more plant-based foods
In a study of 2,717 young adults in the U.S. with long-term follow-up, people who increased the amount of fruits, vegetables, whole grains, nuts and vegetable oils in their diet over 20 years had a 60 percent lower risk of type 2 diabetes compared to those with a small decrease in plant foods. The findings suggest that long-term shifts toward a more plant-centered diet could help prevent diabetes. Yuni Choi, University of Minnesota-Twin Cities, will present this research on Tuesday, June 11, from 11 - 11:15 a.m. in the Baltimore Convention Center, Ballroom IV (abstract).

Large study points to importance of vitamins B2 and B6
Findings from a study examining three large cohorts of U.S. health professionals suggest that people with higher intakes of vitamins B2 and B6 from food or supplements have a lower risk for type 2 diabetes. The study, which included more than 200,000 people, also revealed that consuming higher levels of vitamin B12 from foods was associated with a higher type 2 diabetes risk, which may be due to consumption of animal products. Kim V. E. Braun, Erasmus University Medical Center, will present this research on Sunday, June 9, from 3:15 - 3:30 p.m. in the Baltimore Convention Center, Room 319/320 (abstract).

Food order can affect blood sugar levels
A new study reveals that changing the order in which food is eaten could reduce post-meal blood sugar spikes. The researchers found that eating rice first and then a vegetable and meat caused significantly higher blood sugar levels after eating compared to other sequences. The results point to a simple but effective way to lower blood sugar levels after eating, which could prevent the transition from prediabetes to diabetes. Christiani Henry, Singapore Institutes for Clinical Sciences, will present this research on Saturday, June 8, from 12 - 1 p.m. in the Baltimore Convention Center, Halls A-B (poster 56) (abstract).

The interaction of genes and food

Coffee may lower risk, especially for people with gene variant
A study of more than 4,000 Koreans adds evidence that drinking coffee may lower the risk for developing type 2 diabetes and reveals that a genetic factor could be involved. The researchers found both Korean men and women who drank at least one cup of black coffee a day were less likely to develop prediabetes or type 2 diabetes than those who drank no coffee. The association between drinking coffee and lowered risk for type 2 diabetes was strongest for Koreans with a genetic variation known as rs2074356, which was recently found to be linked with habitual coffee consumption. An Na Kim, Seoul National University, will present this research on behalf of Taiyue Jin on Monday, June 10, from 1:45 - 2:45 p.m. in the Baltimore Convention Center, Halls A-B (poster 502) (abstract).

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This release may include updated numbers or data that differ from those in the abstract submitted to Nutrition 2019.

Please note that abstracts presented at Nutrition 2019 were evaluated and selected by a committee of experts but have not generally undergone the same peer review process required for publication in a scientific journal. As such, the findings presented should be considered preliminary until a peer-reviewed publication is available.

About Nutrition 2019

Nutrition 2019 is the annual meeting of the American Society for Nutrition held June 8-11, 2019 at the Baltimore Convention Center. It is the national venue for more than 3,600 top researchers, practitioners and other professionals to announce exciting research findings and explore their implications for practice and policy. Scientific symposia address the latest advances in cellular and physiological nutrition and metabolism, clinical and translational nutrition, global and public health, population science, and food science and systems. http://www.nutrition.org/N19 #Nutrition2019

About the American Society for Nutrition (ASN)

ASN is the preeminent professional organization for nutrition research scientists and clinicians around the world. Founded in 1928, the society brings together the top nutrition researchers, medical practitioners, policy makers and industry leaders to advance our knowledge and application of nutrition. ASN publishes four peer-reviewed journals and provides education and professional development opportunities to advance nutrition research, practice and education. http://www.nutrition.org

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