News Release 

OU researcher receives Department of Energy Early Career Award

University of Oklahoma

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IMAGE: Bright blue and green luminescence from metal halides prepared by Saparov's research team. view more 

Credit: Provided by Dr. Bayram Saparov, University of Oklahoma

Bayram Saparov, an assistant professor in the Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of Oklahoma College of Arts and Sciences, was selected for a 2020 Early Career Research Award from the Department of Energy's Office of Science.

"The College of Arts and Sciences is thrilled to learn of Dr. Bayram Saparov's receipt of a highly prestigious, five-year DOE Early Career Research Award to support his research, which has major implications for the advancement of renewable energy," said David Wrobel, dean of the College of Arts and Sciences. "Dr. Saparov's work encapsulates the research mission of the college to discover new knowledge that makes our human communities and our natural environment stronger and more sustainable."

Saparov's project explores metal halide materials that could lead to more efficient and lower-cost solar panels and energy-saving light emitting-diodes (LEDs) technology.

"Perhaps the most exciting breakthrough in materials chemistry in the past decade has been the discovery of the outstanding optical and electronic properties of metal halides," Saparov said. "Control of the preparation routes of various metal halides will allow us to custom design materials with properties tailored for specific applications with the goal of ensuring America's security and prosperity by addressing its energy and environmental challenges, which is the mission of the U.S. Department of Energy."

Saparov was one of 76 researchers from 50 universities to receive this award. Under the program, university-based researchers will receive at least $150,000 per year, with research grants spanning five years.

"The Department of Energy is proud to support funding that will sustain America's scientific workforce and create opportunities for our researchers to remain competitive on the world stage," said Under Secretary for Science for Paul Dabbar. "By bolstering our commitment to the scientific community, we invest into our nation's next generation of innovators."

The Early Career Research Program is described as working to bolster the nation's scientific workforce by providing support to exceptional researchers during crucial early career years, when many scientists do their most formative work.

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