News Release 

UNH collaborates with 13 universities to understand climate change and ecosystems

University of New Hampshire

Grant Announcement

DURHAM, N.H.--The University of New Hampshire is one of 14 universities from around the globe that have collectively been awarded $12.5 million by the National Science Foundation (NSF) to launch a new Biology Integration Institute (BII), called EMERGE, which will focus on better understanding ecosystem and climate interactions--like the thawing of the Arctic permafrost--and how they can alter everything from the landscape to greenhouse gases.

EMERGE, which stands for "EMergent Ecosystem Response to ChanGE," is an ambitious five-year project that will concentrate on discovering how the processes that sustain life and enable biological innovation operate and interact within and between each other--from molecules to cells, species and ecosystems--under dynamically changing conditions. The end result will be a new "genes-to-ecosystems-to-genes" framework to create models that could help predict ecosystem response to change.

"Being able to predict how ecosystems respond to climate change is a pressing societal need," said Ruth Varner, professor of biogeochemistry at UNH and co-director for EMERGE. "We have assembled a large interdisciplinary team to tackle the complex research questions that face our world today like whether thawing permafrost could increase emissions of the greenhouse gas methane and actually further accelerate climate change."

The project will be led by The Ohio State University and consist of a team of 33 scientists representing 15 specialties. The partnership brings together expertise inside and outside of biology, such as ecology and evolution, organismal biology, team science, and modeling and computational science.

"Ecosystems respond to changing conditions, like a new agricultural practice or changing rainfall patterns, in a way that is greater than the sum of the responses of individual parts," said Virginia Rich, associate professor of microbiology at Ohio State and co-director for EMERGE. "To address this challenge head-on, our team will pull cutting-edge ideas and methods from across biology and beyond into a unified vision for seeing what each discipline, alone, cannot--piecing back together the forest from the trees, if you will. It is incredibly exciting."

The research will be done in Stordalen Mire, a long-studied peatland in northern Sweden where permafrost thaw drives changes in the landscape, plants and microbes. The institute, which will launch in September, will also have a strong training, education and outreach component and will involve biologists at the postdoctoral, graduate and undergraduate levels.

Participating universities include University of Arizona, Florida State University, Colorado State University at Fort Collins, Case Western Reserve University, University of California at Berkeley, Rochester Institute of Technology, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Joint Genome Institute, all in the United States; Lund University, Umeå University and Stockholm University, all in Sweden; and Queensland University of Technology in Australia.

The University of New Hampshire inspires innovation and transforms lives in our state, nation and world. More than 16,000 students from all 50 states and 71 countries engage with an award-winning faculty in top-ranked programs in business, engineering, law, health and human services, liberal arts and the sciences across more than 200 programs of study. As one of the nation's highest-performing research universities, UNH partners with NASA, NOAA, NSF and NIH, and receives more than $110 million in competitive external funding every year to further explore and define the frontiers of land, sea and space.

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PHOTOS FOR DOWNLOAD

CAPTION: Scientists walking on boardwalk to carry gear out to research site in the Stordalen Mire, a long-studied peatland in northern Sweden where permafrost thaw drives changes in the landscape, plants and microbes.
LINK: https://drive.google.com/file/d/11BWklr3PMUdkdwUEhyfYgXr9Zr6jhVoP/view
PHOTO CREDIT: Patrick Crill/Stockholm University

CAPTION: Boardwalks used to help researchers access key areas in the Stordalen Mire, a long-studied peatland in northern Sweden, collapse due to flooding from excessive permafrost thaw.
LINK: https://drive.google.com/file/d/1GQ8_qtvycg1G71h4MkF7kqvnG2W5GlOb/view
PHOTO CREDIT: Patrick Crill/Stockholm University

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