News Release 

Processed meat linked to higher risk of mortality and cardiovascular disease

Multinational study published in The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition suggests that consumption of moderate amounts of unprocessed meat is okay, but processed meats should be avoided

American Society for Nutrition

Research News

Key Points

  • The PURE study is the first multinational study exploring the association between unprocessed and processed meat intakes with health outcomes in low-, middle-, and high-income countries.
  • The consumption of unprocessed red meat and poultry was not found to be associated with mortality nor major cardiovascular disease events.
  • In contrast, higher processed meat intake was associated with higher risks of both total mortality and major cardiovascular disease.

Rockville, MD - Red meat is a major source of medium- and long-chain saturated fatty acids, which may lead to an increased risk of cardiovascular disease. Processed meat, which has been modified to improve taste or extend its shelf-life, has also been associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular disease. Dietary guidelines therefore recommend limiting the consumption of both red and processed meat based on studies that have linked them to higher risks of cardiovascular disease. These studies, however, have come primarily from populations in North America and Europe, limiting their global applicability.

Published in The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition (AJCN), "Associations of Unprocessed and Processed Meat Intake with Mortality and Cardiovascular Disease in 21 countries (PURE): A Prospective Cohort Study," has helped to rectify a major research gap, helping us better understand the global health impact of meat and meat product consumption. Dr. Romaina Iqbal, first author of the study noted, "evidence of an association between meat intake and cardiovascular disease is inconsistent. We therefore wanted to better understand the associations between intakes of unprocessed red meat, poultry, and processed meat with major cardiovascular disease events and mortality."

In order to conduct their research, the authors of this study worked with data from the Prospective Urban Rural Epidemiological (PURE) study, a long-term study launched in 2003 by Dr. Salim Yusuf, Director of Population Health Research Institute, Canada, and Principal Investigator of the PURE study. The PURE study has tracked the dietary habits and health outcomes of more than 164,000 participants from 21 low-, middle-, and high-income countries across five continents.

According to Dr. Mahshid Dehghan, one of the study's authors and Investigator at the Population Health Research Institute of McMaster University and Hamilton Health Sciences, "the PURE study is the first multinational study that provides information on the association between unprocessed and processed meat intakes with health outcomes from low- and middle-income countries. Moreover, the PURE study examines substantially more diverse populations and broad patterns of diet, enabling us to provide new evidence."

Participants' dietary habits were recorded via the use of food frequency questionnaires. In addition, data was collected on participants' mortality and major cardiovascular disease events, enabling the study authors to determine the associations between meat consumption patterns and cardiovascular disease events and mortality.

Upon completing their analysis, the study authors "did not find significant associations between unprocessed red meat and poultry intake with mortality or major cardiovascular disease." By contrast, processed meat intake was associated with higher risks of total mortality and major cardiovascular disease.

The authors believe that additional research may enhance our current understanding of the relationship between meat consumption and health outcomes. For example, it isn't clear what study participants with lower meat intakes were eating instead of meat, and if the quality of those foods differed between countries. These substitutions may have implications in further interpreting the associations between meat consumption and health outcomes. Nonetheless, the authors believe their findings "indicate that limiting the intake of processed meat should be encouraged."

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Reference

Iqbal R, Dehghan M, Mente A, Rangajaran S, Wielgosz A, Avezum A, Seron P, AlHabib KF, Lopez-Jaramillo P, Swaminathan S, et al. Associations of unprocessed and processed meat intake with mortality and cardiovascular disease in 21 countries [Prospective Urban Rural Epidemiology (PURE) Study]: a prospective cohort study. The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, nqaa448, https://doi.org/10.1093/ajcn/nqaa448.

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About The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition

The most highly rated peer-reviewed, primary research journal in nutrition and dietetics, The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition (AJCN) publishes the latest research on topics in nutrition such as obesity, vitamins and minerals, nutrition and disease, and energy metabolism. Visit us online at academic.oup.com/ajcn or follow us on Twitter @AJCNutrition #AJCN.

About the American Society for Nutrition

ASN is the preeminent professional organization for nutrition research scientists and clinicians around the world. Founded in 1928, the society brings together the top nutrition researchers, medical practitioners, policy makers and industry leaders to advance our knowledge and application of nutrition. ASN advances excellence in nutrition research and practice through its publications, education, public affairs, membership programs, and annual meeting, Nutrition. Visit ASN online at nutrition.org.

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