News Release

Could new discovery help treat a rare and severe form of amyloidosis?

Peer-Reviewed Publication

Wiley

In people with a rare condition called light chain amyloidosis, light chain proteins—which are a component of antibodies—mutate and build up in different organs. In new research published in The FEBS Journal, investigators have identified and characterized an antibody fragment that can bind to abnormal light chains to stabilize them and prevent their aggregation.

The findings could have an important clinical impact because the current prognosis for individuals with light chain amyloidosis is extremely poor, and current treatments, which rely on attacking the defective light chain–producing cells, are difficult to tolerate.

The results may also be applicable to other forms of amyloidosis, including Alzheimer’s disease.

“We are excited by this finding, which has potential to provide a much-needed treatment for people diagnosed with light chain amyloidosis,” said corresponding author Jillian Madine, PhD, of the University of Liverpool, in the UK.

URL upon publication: https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/febs.17223

 

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About the Journal
The FEBS Journal is an international peer-reviewed journal devoted to publication of high-quality papers reporting significant advances in the molecular life sciences.

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